yoga teacher trainingBy: Virginia Iversen, M.Ed

The iridescence of the beauty of the blue-purple morning glory flower is beyond dispute. In the early morning rays of the sun, this enticing beautiful flower begins to open to the bourgeoning warmth of the sun’s rays. The blue-purple morning glory most closely resembles the scintillating colors of the Throat Chakra. The Throat Chakra is also known as the Fifth Chakra in the Yogic system of the swirling energy vortexes that are found along the central axis of the body. In Sanskrit, the Throat Chakra is known as the Visuddha Chakra.

According to ancient mystic Yogis and Yoginis, this chakra is a sixteen-petal flower that pulsates with a bluish-purple color and, upon which, the sixteen letters of the Sanskrit vowels are written in gold. At the very center of the Visuddha Chakra is a pure white color where its bija or seed mantra resonates with the sound “ham.” One of the most well known Sanskrit mantras is So-Ham. When this mantra is repeated for an extended period of time, it will help to remove blockages in the Throat Chakra area. Repeating this mantra also helps to soothe the heart and balance the movement of prana between the Heart and Throat Chakras.

When the Throat Chakra is blocked, our very sense of self and the ability to verbalize our thoughts and feelings is also blocked. Energetically, this blockage prevents the Kundalini energy from freely rising to the Crown Chakra. When the Throat Chakra is blocked from traumatic emotional experiences or physical injuries and/or illnesses, our life force energy can also become blocked and stagnant. According to some Yogic teachings, one of the primary reasons for a blocked Throat Chakra is a feeling of guilt.

Some other reasons for a blocked Throat Chakra may include not wanting to be truly visible to those around us because of the vulnerability that visibility may generate, or a deep-seated shame that surfaces when our own needs become evident. If you focus on your own Throat Chakra, you will have the opportunity to viscerally feel if this area is contracted and closed down. If so, you may experience tension throughout the front of your neck and hunched up shoulders that are trying to protect you from the potential backlash of speaking up for yourself.

As a Yoga practitioner, you have many options for keeping your Visuddha Chakra area vibrant and energized. Some of the physical postures of Yoga that help to keep this chakra healthy and balanced are Shoulder Stand, Plow and Camel Pose. Additionally, there are a number of pranayama exercises that help to remove energetic obstructions throughout the entire chakra system. Khecari Mudra and Jalandhara Banda also help to nurture a healthy Visuddha Chakra.

* Camel Pose

Camel Pose is one of the most effective Yoga postures for opening up the Throat Chakra, as well as the entire front side of the body (To practice Camel Pose, warm up first with a series of Sun Salutations). If you are not familiar with the poses of the Sun Salutations, please refer to a reputable Yoga teacher training website or visit a professional Yoga studio in your area for personalized instruction. Camel Pose is usually practiced after warming up with a series of Sun Salutations and Standing Yoga poses.

When you are warmed up and ready to practice Camel Pose, come to a kneeling position at the front of your Yoga mat. Keep your knees comfortably far apart and parallel to the sides of you mat. With an inhale, raise your arms overhead, and then fluidly bring them down and place your palms on your lower back with your fingers facing up. If you are feeling quite flexible today, you may wish to increase the intensity of the pose by placing your hands on your ankles. Keep breathing deeply, and with an exhale; gracefully open your chest area by gently dropping your head back.

If you have a neck injury, you may wish to keep your gaze straight ahead and not drop your head back. Hold this pose for 3-5 complete breaths, and with your next inhale, release your hands and come back up to a kneeling position on your Yoga mat. Slowly fold down into Child’s Pose and rest for a few moments before repeating Camel Pose two more times. During a Yoga class, Camel Pose is usually followed by several more back bending poses before moving on to seated forward folds, inversions and Shavasana.

© Copyright 2014 – Virginia Iversen / Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division

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